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Coronavirus update

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Common Questions

 

Answers to common questions

COVID-19, Testing

JCDHE doesn’t set the guidelines for testing. They are set by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and the CDC. JCDHE is working with KDHE to ensure that appropriate testing of symptomatic individuals is carried out when necessary. Due to the widescale shortages of laboratory supplies and reagents, not all individuals with symptoms will meet the definition for testing. More information about KDHE’s testing criteria can be found here: https://govstatus.egov.com/coronavirus.

Doctors usually have the swabs needed to get the specimen. If you have symptoms and your doctor wants to test you for COVID-19, the doctor can send your specimen to a commercial laboratory for testing. Specimens can also be sent to the Kansas Department of Health and Environmental Laboratories if a patient meets certain criteria:

  • Healthcare workers and first responders who have COVID-19 symptoms.
  • Potential clusters of unknown respiratory illness, with priority given to long-term care facilities and healthcare facilities.
  • Hospitalized patients with no alternative diagnosis.
  • Individuals over the age of 60 who have symptoms of COVID-19 with priority given to people who reside in a nursing home, long-term care facility, or other congregate setting.
  • Individuals with underlying health conditions that would be treated differently if they were infected with COVID-19.

 

Commercial testing is available when ordered by a doctor. Currently, community-wide testing is not available in our area.

JCDHE receives reports of positive COVID-19 cases from physicians, private laboratories, hospitals and the Kansas Department of Health and Environmental Laboratories. However, these numbers are not representative of the total number of individuals with COVID-19 in Johnson County, Kansas. With limited testing supplies, only those who meet certain criteria are tested, so there are likely many more cases of COVID-19 in our community that are not being reported.

Due to limited testing supplies, only those who are symptomatic and meet certain criteria are considered for testing. Your physician will assess your symptoms and determine if testing is necessary. Currently, community-wide testing is not available in our area.

Call your health care provider, meaning a doctor’s office or urgent care center — but only if you show symptoms of the virus (fever and cough or shortness of breath). The provider will decide whether you need to be tested. Keep in mind that there is no treatment for COVID-19 and that 80% of those who are ill will experience mild symptoms so you may be able to isolate and care for yourself at home.

There are no medications specifically approved for this novel coronavirus. Most people with mild COVID-19 illness will recover on their own by drinking plenty of fluids, resting, and taking pain and fever medications. However, some people have developed pneumonia and require medical care or hospitalization.

COVID-19, General

Masks are not recommended for HEALTHY people. Masks for health care workers are recommended.

YES. This information is subject to change, so for the latest, visit the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) website regularly.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has added two new states to the quarantine list: Louisiana and Colorado. Previously, just certain counties in Colorado were included. This is effective for persons returning today, March 27, and moving forward.

A comprehensive list of those Kansans needing to quarantine for 14 days includes those who have:

  • Traveled to Louisiana or anywhere in Colorado on or after March 27.
  • Traveled to a state with known widespread community transmission (California, Florida, New York and Washington state) on or after March 15.
  • Traveled to Illinois or New Jersey on or after March 23.
  • Visited Eagle, Summit, Pitkin and Gunnison counties in Colorado in the week of March 8 or after.
  • Traveled on a cruise ship or river cruise on or after March 15.
  • People who have previously been told by Public Health to quarantine because of their cruise ship travel should finish out their quarantine.
  • Traveled internationally on or after March 15.
  • People who have previously been told by Public Health to quarantine because of their international travel to China, South Korea, Japan, Italy and Iran should finish out their quarantine.
  • Received notification from public health officials (state or local) that you are a close contact of a laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19. You should quarantine at home for 14 days since your last contact with the case. (A close contact is defined as someone who has been closer than 6 feet for more than 10 minutes while the patient is symptomatic.)

Additional guidance

Yes, you may go outside. Maintain 6 feet of social distancing and avoid crowds and groups of 10+ people.

Currently, there is no evidence of COVID-19 spreading through imported goods.

While we are still learning about this new virus, CDC guidance says the COVID-19 virus is transmitted by being in close contact with someone who has the virus – within 6 feet for more than 10 minutes or through respiratory droplets when someone coughs or sneezes. Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. 

If you are identified as a close contact of someone who is a laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19, JCDHE will contact you so you can quarantine at home for 14 days. Simply walking past someone with COVID-19 at the grocery store or a restaurant is not considered a close contact which is why we don’t publish the locations of where laboratory-confirmed cases have been.

Now that COVID-19 is circulating in the community, the best way to avoid getting the virus is to not be exposed to it. Avoiding crowds and large gatherings (more than 10 people), staying away from sick people and maintaining physical distance between others (6-8 feet) is the best way to protect yourself.

In severe cases, infection can cause bronchitis, pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and even death. From what we know so far, illness seems to be more severe in older individuals and in people with other health conditions.

Avoid discretionary travel, shopping trips and social visits. Cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have been reported in many states, and some areas are experiencing community spread of the disease. Crowded travel settings, like airports, may increase chances of getting COVID-19, if there are other travelers with coronavirus infection. Travel guidelines: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/index.html

The Kansas statute requires that appeals must be made within 30 days of the mailing date of the notice. The county appraiser does not have the authority to extend this deadline.

However, the statutes do provide a second opportunity to appeal. This process is called "A Payment under Protest." When you pay your first half taxes by Dec. 20, you can file a protest at that time with the Treasurer’s Office.

If you have further questions, please call the Appraiser's Office at 913-715-9000 during normal business hours.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) indicates it is a respiratory disease caused by a new coronavirus first identified in 2019. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness like the common cold.

Yes, there is community spread in Kansas. Similar to how the flu and/or the common cold is spread, this means that it is spread from person to person through coughs or sneezes or by touching contaminated surfaces.

COVID-19 is spread when healthy people are exposed to droplets from a cough or a sneeze from an infected person. Chances of infection increase when a person is closer than about 6 feet for longer than 10 minutes. The virus can also live on surfaces and can be transmitted when people touch surfaces then touch their face or food.

Anyone who is exposed COVID-19 may become infected. Traveling to an area with widespread transmission of COVID-19 increases your risk.

High-risk persons include older adults and people who are immunocompromised and/or have severe chronic medical conditions (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, lung disease).

A MILD case of COVID-19 causes mild fever, headache, body aches and cough. A SEVERE case of COVID-19 causes fever, cough and shortness of breath (i.e., difficulty breathing while doing daily activities, going up stairs, walking, eating, bathing, sleeping, talking, etc. and is NOT related to a previous health condition). Some patients may develop pneumonia. Symptoms appear two-14 days after exposure.

Stay home. If your symptoms are mild, manage them at home. Contact your healthcare provider for further instructions and/or recommendations and to rule out other common illnesses. If symptoms worsen and you are unable to manage your symptoms at home, contact your healthcare provider, urgent care, local hospital, or 911 and make them aware of your symptoms prior to arriving.

NO. Being exposed to COVID-19 is not an emergency. Call your healthcare provider to discuss your exposure and symptoms. Do NOT go to your healthcare provider office or clinic until after you have spoken with someone in the office or clinic. 

There is no vaccine for COVID-19. At this time, over-the-counter medications (e.g., acetaminophen and ibuprofen and cough and/or cold medicines) can be used to treat symptoms. It is also important to stay hydrated with water and limit caffeinated drinks. If you are unable to stay hydrated, become unable to care for yourself, or begin to have shortness of breath, then you should contact emergency services.

It is unknown. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is working with public health agencies and scientists to learn more about COVID-19.

In general, symptoms usually appear 2–14 days after exposure. CDC is gathering information on whether this novel coronavirus can be spread by people before they show symptoms. At this time, CDC’s guidance is based on the available science, which suggests that the incubation period ranges from 2 to 14 days and that patients are most contagious when they have a fever/symptoms.

 

Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. Use a tissue or a sleeve when you cough or sneeze. Avoid touching your face. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. Stay home if you are sick. Disinfect “high-touch” surfaces (i.e., tables, toilets, light switches, phones, doorknobs) every day with EPA approved disinfectant or diluted bleach (1/3 cup bleach:1 gallon water) or 60% alcohol-based solution. Avoid crowds and groups greater than 10 persons.

Johnson County COVID-19 Hotline

If you have virus-related questions, call the Johnson County Community COVID-19 Hotline.

Staffed by school nurses from across Johnson County.
913-715-CV19 (2819)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Non health-related questions, should be directed to:

Johnson County Call Center

913-715-5000
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

State Stay at Home Order

Questions about the state’s stay at home order can be emailed to KEFF@ks.gov.

Child Care Licensing COVID-19 Hotline

913-477-8361
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Kansas Department of Health and Environment

1-866-534-3463 (1-866-KDHEINF)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Sunday, 1 - 5 p.m.


 

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If you have virus-related questions, call the Johnson County Community COVID-19 Hotline.

Staffed by school nurses from across Johnson County.
913-715-CV19 (2819)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Non health-related questions, should be directed to:

Johnson County Call Center

913-715-5000
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

State Stay at Home Order

Questions about the state’s stay at home order can be emailed to KEFF@ks.gov.

Child Care Licensing COVID-19 Hotline

913-477-8361
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Kansas Department of Health and Environment

1-866-534-3463 (1-866-KDHEINF)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Sunday, 1 - 5 p.m.