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Mental Health

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Johnson County Mental Health Center

Need some help coping during this public health crisis? Here is our short, simple and curated list of resources.


Service updates related to COVID-19

Tuesday, July 27, 3:55 p.m.

Johnson County Mental Health Center is immediately reinstating our mask requirement based on the latest guidance from the CDC. All individuals, regardless of vaccination status, will be required to wear a mask.

  • The 24/7 Crisis Line (913-268-0156) is for any individual personally experiencing a mental health crisis or with someone who is experiencing a mental health crisis.
  • The Customer Care Center (913-826-4200) is available during business hours on weekdays for any non-emergency needs. Individuals can leave a message after hours, which will be returned the following business day.
  • Walk-in services, also known as Open Access, are available beginning at 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. each weekday at the Olathe or Shawnee offices.

Resources related to the coronavirus and mental health

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Featured resources

Elevate for Educators
In partnership with EVERFI, Johnson County Mental Health Center is providing health and wellness education to educators across our county. Elevate for Educators is a self-guided, digital mental wellness resource designed to provide educators with on-demand content related to their unique mental health needs. School professionals will find a variety of topics, including managing mental health challenges, supporting a friend or loved one, and strategies for stress management.

It's Okay if You're not Okay with COVID-19
This article is a great place to start if you're trying to figure out how the pandemic might be impacting the way your are thinking, feeling or acting and what you can do to manage those experiences.

Mental Health Moment
Sign-up to get a weekly note of positivity in your inbox, focusing on kindness, coping and connection.

It's Okay if You're not Okay podcast
This mental health podcast with personality launched in September of 2019, but has been doing some special episodes related to coping and self-care in these challenging times.

The Compassion Project and other resources for at home learning
We've partnered with EVERFI to offer a variety of resources for every elementary, middle and high school student in Johnson County.

Front Line Support
We're providing expanded mental health support to front line workers and first reponders during the pandemic.

Building Blocks for Anti-racism
Johnson County Mental Health Center has a commitment to anti-racism. These are the building blocks of how we intend to carry out that commitment.

Youth Health Guide
This guide will give you the facts and provide you with easy steps you can take to live a healthy life physically, mentally and emotionally. For a more accessible version please reach out to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

Additional resources

How to prepare for a virtual appointment
Helping children cope with disasters
Children's reactions and parents' response
Helping kids cope with COVID-19 anxiety
Managing anxiety for adults
Resource for older adults and people with disabilities


Johnson County Mental Health Center is the gateway to mental health in Johnson County, providing a wide range of mental health and substance abuse services to county residents. 

Click this Access Services button to learn how to access mental health services
Click to learn how to access mental health services.

 

Department News

Johnson County named Stepping Up Innovator County for efforts to reduce the number of people with mental illnesses in jail
May 1, 2020

Johnson County was selected as one of seven counties in the nation as a Stepping Up Innovator County for its expertise in taking actions to reduce the number of people in jail who experience mental illness.

As an Innovator County, Johnson County’s efforts will be highlighted as part of a new push from Stepping Up: A National Initiative to Reduce the Number of People with Mental Illnesses in Jails to help counties consistently identify and collect data on this population.

“On behalf of the Board of County Commissioners, I want to congratulate the county professionals — mental health clinicians, law enforcement officers and many others — who have worked hard to earn this national designation and to better serve our community’s vulnerable populations,” said Chairman Ed Eilert.

Each of the seven Innovator Counties is using the Stepping Up suggested three-step approach to having accurate, accessible data on people who have serious mental illness in their jails.

Those steps include: establish a shared definition of serious mental illness for local criminal justice and behavioral health systems’ Stepping Up efforts; ensure everyone booked into jail is screened for mental illness and those who screen positive are referred to a follow-up clinical assessment and regularly report on this population.

“Every day, people with mental illness are booked into jails across the country,” said Mental Health Center Director Tim DeWeese. “The number of people who have mental illnesses in jail is three to six times higher than that of the general public. We’re grateful to the county’s leadership for making Stepping Up a priority, allowing us to help those who experience mental illness avoid incarceration and to receive the help they deserve.”

Read More: http://www.shawneedispatch.com/news/2018/may/17/johnson-county-named-stepping-innovator-county-eff/

Proposed Kansas law would cut back suicide prevention training in schools
May 1, 2020

A bill moving through the Senate committee process could possibly change a law requiring schools to train all their employees on suicide prevention.

Those who support the bill say they are in support of the training, but they want to reduce the number of people required to take it.

Right now, every worker in Kansas schools is required to be trained to spot people with suicidal tendencies.

State lawmakers approved the Jason Flatt Act in 2016 which requires a minimum of one hour of training per person every school year. Now, a bill moving through the senate committee process could change that. 

“We just feel that there’s a price tag for people that are being trained that probably don’t have the connection with kids," said G.A. Buie, Executive Director of the Kansas Superintendents Association.

The proposed bill would change it so only “selected” staff would be required to do training. It would also remove the one-hour minimum.

Supporters say it’s not necessary to train people who have little contact with students. But, mental health experts disagree. They say the more people the better the chances of stopping someone from taking their life.

“I believe that you have to have interaction to be able to ask the most difficult question, and that is: are you thinking of killing yourself or are you thinking of committing suicide?” said Tim Deweese, Director of Johnson County Mental Health Center.

Read More : http://www.kctv5.com/story/37470692/proposed-kansas-law-would-cut-back-suicide-prevention-training-in-schools

Youth suicide rates are rising in Kansas. A teen crisis center in Johnson County could help
June 2, 2021

Youth suicide rates are rising in Kansas. A teen crisis center in Johnson County could help

But in the entire state of Kansas, no such public facility exists for teenagers. What’s more, the number of psychiatric residential treatment beds available to serve children in Kansas has plummeted in recent years, from about 780 in 2011, to only about 208 now.

At all times, about 15 Johnson County teenagers are on a waiting list for an open bed.

This is why a suicidal teenager might wind up in the juvenile unit at the Johnson County Detention Center instead of an appropriate mental health center. And the police officer who brings the youth there must stay with them, as the building is neither staffed nor designed to care for children suffering a mental health crisis.

Three Johnson County officials are working on a solution: Tim DeWeese, director of the county’s mental health center; Robert Sullivan, director of corrections; and Ted Jester, director of juvenile services.

They’ve scoured county buildings for an available space and have tapped state officials to map out licensing requirements.

The men began their work shortly before the death of John Albers, a suicidal 17-year-old who was shot and killed by an Overland Park police officer last month.

The tragedy steeled their resolve. As did news that two Shawnee Mission Northwest High School students took their own lives. And all of the other cases of young people dealing with mental health conditions, most of which do not become headline news.

Both Missouri and Kansas have high rates of youth suicide. And the pace is accelerating.

Envisioned is a crisis center that Kansas parents could bring children to as well. Nearly 50 percent of people treated at crisis centers can be stabilized within the first 48 hours, Sullivan said.

Mental health program expands in Johnson County
May 1, 2020

When it comes to mental health calls police are often the first responders, but despite some training, officers don't specialize in those types of issues. 

That's why Johnson County is expanding a program that dispatched trained professionals with officers on mental health calls. 

The trained professionals are called co-responders. 

Read More at: KSHB NEWS

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24 Hour Emergency Services
913-268-0156

Upcoming Events

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Tue, 10/19/2021 - 9:00am

Mental Health First Aid: Virtual Session

Wed, 11/03/2021 - 9:00am

Mental Health First Aid: Virtual Session

Mon, 11/22/2021 - 5:30pm

Mental Health Advisory Board

Thu, 12/02/2021 - 9:00am

Mental Health First Aid: Virtual Session