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Food Guide

Food Guide Information

What's a Serving?

Bread, Cereal, Rice & Pasta Group:

  • 1 slice of bread or small pita
  • 1/2 bagel or English muffin
  • 1/2 cup cooked cereal, rice or pasta

Vegetable Group:

  • 1 cup raw leafy vegetables
  • 1/2 cup cooked or chopped raw vegetables
  • 1 medium potato
  • 3/4 cup vegetable juice

Fruit Group:

  • 1 medium orange, apple or banana
  • 1/2 grapefruit
  • 1/2 cup berries or cut-up fruit
  • 3/4 cup fruit juice

Milk, Yogurt & Cheese Group:

  • 1 cup milk or yogurt
  • 1-1/2 ounces natural cheese
  • 2 ounces processed cheese

Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, & Nuts Group:

  • 2-3 ounces cooked lean meat, skinless poultry or fish
  • 1/2 cup dried beans
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup tuna
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 1/3 cup nuts

Additional information for adults

WICShopper App for Mobile Devices

WIC Shopper App logoThe WICShopper app makes grocery shopping simple and easy. Scan food items to verify if they are WIC-eligible, view recipes and get nutrition education right on your mobile device for free. 

Download from Apple iTunes for iOS devices

Download from the Google Play Store for Android devices

Food Packages

Pregnant, breastfeeding, and postpartum women, and children one to five years of age may receive:

  • Milk
  • Natural cheese
  • Eggs
  • Iron-fortified cereal
  • Vitamin C rich juice
  • Dry beans, peas, or peanut butter
  • Canned beans
  • Tuna (as applicable)
  • Pink salmon (as applicable)
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • 100% whole wheat bread
  • Tortillas
  • Brown rice
  • Yogurt
  • Tofu

Infants may receive:

  • Special breastfeeding support or infant formula for the first year
  • Infant cereal, fresh fruits and vegetables starting at 6 months
  • Phase two fruits and veggies
  • Pureed meats at an appropriate age (as applicable)

WICShopper App for Mobile Devices

WIC Shopper App LogoThe WICShopper app makes grocery shopping simple and easy. Scan food items to verify if they are WIC-eligible, view recipes and get nutrition education right on your mobile device for free.

Download from Apple iTunes for iOS devices

Download from the Google Play Store for Android devices

Food Policy Council

Food Policy Council

The Johnson County Food Policy Council serves an advisory body to the Johnson County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) and other decision makers in Johnson County that reviews and recommends policies to strengthen the local food economy and improve access to healthy and nutritious food.

The mission of the Johnson County Food Policy Council is to improve the health and wellbeing of individuals, the community and our environment through a just, equitable and sustainable food system in Johnson County. Through policy recommendations, education and collaborations, we strive to increase access to healthful food that is locally produced when available.

Johnson County Food Policy Council (JCFPC) will achieve its mission by:

  • Creating a forum for discussion and coordination for community-wide efforts to improve the nutritional, environmental, economic and social health of Johnson County.

  • Building the capacity of local food policy bodies to find common ground on policy priorities, generate public support for those policies, and educate residents and community leaders on issues in our food system.

  • Developing strategies to effectively address food access, hunger, obesity, community development, economic development, urban agriculture, food waste, nutrition and food education.

All Food Policy Council meetings are held the thrid Tuesday of every month from 11:30am - 1:30pm and alternate between the Olathe and MIssion JCDHE locations.

2018 Meeting Dates:

April 17, 2018 - 6000 Lamar Avenue,  Mission, KS 66202

May 15, 2018 - 11875 S Sunset, Olathe, KS  66061

June 19, 2018 - 6000 Lamar Avenue, Mission, KS 66202

July 17, 2018 - 11875 S Sunset, Olathe, KS  66061

August 21, 2018 - 6000 Lamar Avenue, Mission, KS 66202

September 18, 2018 - 11875 S Sunset, Olathe, KS  66061

October 16, 2018 - 6000 Lamar Avenue, Mission, KS 66202 - meeting cancelled for October

November 20, 2018 - 11875 S Sunset, Olathe, KS  66061

December 18, 2018 - 6000 Lamar Avenue, Mission, KS 66202

Logo for Johnson County Food Policy Council

Supporting Documents

Research and Data

 

HIV Testing

Johnson County Department of Health and Environment offers HIV testing at both the Olathe and Mission walk-in clinics. HIV testing is always free, but clients are charged for an office visit. A sliding pay scale based on income is offered and no one is turned away due to inability to pay.

Olathe Clinic Hours

  • Monday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday - 10:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
  • Thursday - CLOSED
  • Friday - 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Mission Clinic Hours

  • Monday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday - 10:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
  • Thursday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Friday - CLOSED

Web Resources

  • www.cdc.gov -Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • www.kdheks.gov -Kansas Department of Health and Environment
  • www.thebody.com -Information about HIV/AIDS, including FAQs and an “ask the experts” feature.
  • www.hivtest.org -FAQs about HIV/AIDS and a search tool for finding local testing locations. Sponsored by the CDC.
  • www.iwannaknow.org -Information for young people about sexual health and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Sponsored by the American Social Health Association.
  • www.outproud.org -Information about issues related to sexual identity for young people and educators, sponsored by the National Coalition for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Youth.
  • www.rainn.org -Informational resources and an online hotline specializing in sexual assault. Sponsored by the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network.
  • www.stayteen.org -Informational resources and community activities to help prevent teen and unintended pregnancy. Sponsored by the National Campaign to prevent Teen and Unintended Pregnancy.
  • www.teenshealth.org -Information, FAQs and an “ask the experts” feature for teens about health issues, including sexual health. Sponsored by Nemours Foundation.

Hotlines

  • 1-800-CDC-INFO
    1-800-232-4636
    1-888-232-6348 TTY
    - CDC-INFO - (Formerly known as the CDC National STD and AIDS Hotline) - Available 24 hours a day, in English and Spanish; counselors available to answer questions about personal health issues, including HIV and other STDs; online zip code tool for finding local HIV and STD testing locations also available at www.hivtest.org and www.stdtest.org. Sponsored by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Domestic Violence Hotline
  • 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) | 1-800-787-3224 (TTY) - Available 24 hours a day, every day, in English and Spanish; victims and anyone calling on their behalf can provide crisis intervention, safety planning, and information and referrals to agencies in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands.National Sexual Assault Hotline
  • 1-800-656-HOPE (4673) - Sponsored by the Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network (RAINN); Online Hotline also available at (www.rainn.org).

Immunization Fees

The Johnson County Department of Health and Environment (JCDHE) is not a primary care provider. If you need medical treatment, please call your health care provider or the Health Partnership Clinic at 913-648-2266. If you need a copy of your medical records, please complete the Release of Information Authorization (English) or Autorización de Divulgación de Información (Español) form and return to us. If you need a copy of your immunization records, call 913-826-1200 or send an email to MedicalRecords-DHE@jocogov.org.

We accept private insurance from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City, Cigna, Coventry and UnitedHealthcare. We do not take insurance from Coventry Advantra or Humana Gold Plus. We are a KanCare provider for all managed care organizations such as Amerigroup, Sunflower and United Community. Many of the services we provide are covered by insurance; check your health benefit plan to confirm coverage for payment of services.

Cash, check or credit card payment is also accepted for those who are without insurance or who carry other insurance plans. Private pay immunizations have to be paid at the time of service. Prices are subject to change based on cost of vaccine.

What to Bring with You

  • Your or your child's immunization record
  • Insurance card

Immunizations:

  • Chickenpox (Varicella), $135
  • DTaP - Pediatric, $39
  • Hepatitis A - Adult/Pediatric (age 18 & under), $85/$56 (per shot, 2 shot series)
  • Hepatitis B - Adult/Pediatric (age 19 & under), $68/$56 (per shot, 3 shot series)
  • Hib, $43
  • HPV (Gardasil) 9, $218 (per shot, 3 shot series)
  • Influenza (Seasonal Flu)
  • Kinrix, $61 (per shot)
  • Measles/Mumps/Rubella, $85
  • Measles/Mumps/Rubella/Varicella (ProQuad), $209
  • Meningitis: Menomune/Menactra, $136
  • Meningitis B: Trumenba, $153 (per shot, 3 shot series)
  • Pediarix, $77 (per shot)
  • Pneumo 13 (Prevnar 13), $200
  • Pneumococcal (Pneumovax 23), $99
  • Polio, $50
  • Rotavirus, $119
  • Shingles (Shingrix, age 50+), $250 (per shot, 2 shot series) - Call for availability
  • Tdap/Tetanus diphtheria, $63/$50
  • Typhoid Vi, $116
  • Prescription for Oral Typhoid, $10

Tuberculin Skin Test (TST):

$26 per test; $20 per test reading

TB Blood Test (T-Spot):

$147 per test

Immunization Consent Form

A written consent form is required for all immunizations. A parent or guardian must provide a written consent form for children under 18. Please bring child's current immunization record to the visit.

Immunizations

Nurse drawing up vaccine

Clients 18 years and younger with private health insurance are required to provide documentation of immunization coverage. All immunizations are given on a walk-in basis. Immunization prices can be found on the Fees page. Immunization questions? Call 913-826-1261 and leave a message. If you need a copy of your immunization records, call 913-826-1200 or send an email to MedicalRecords-DHE@jocogov.org.

What to Bring with You

  • Your or your child's immunization record
  • Insurance card

Immunization Clinic Hours (Olathe & Mission):

The Mission immunization clinic is closed daily from 12:30-1:30 p.m.; the Olathe clinic remains open.

  • Monday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday - 10:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
  • Thursday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Friday (Olathe) - 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.; Mission - CLOSED

JCDHE is a KanCare provider for all managed care organizations: Amerigroup, Sunflower and United Community. JCDHE also accepts private insurance from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City, Cigna, Coventry and UnitedHealthcare. We do not take insurance from Coventry Advantra or Humana Gold Plus. Many of the services JCDHE offers are covered by insurance; check your health benefit plan to confirm coverage for payment of services.

JCDHE also accepts cash, check, credit or debit card as payment for clients who are without insurance or who carry other insurance plans.

Private pay immunizations have to be paid at the time of service. Price is subject to change based on cost of vaccine.

Types of Immunizations Available

  • Flu Shots (seasonal)
  • Adult Immunizations
  • Childhood Immunizations
  • Travel Immunizations

School Required Immunizations

Parents/guardians are urged to make vaccinations an early priority for school children. The department gets busier as school enrollment approaches, so getting children vaccinated early will save time. Vaccines protect children against infections that can be deadly or cause problems such as blindness and hearing loss.

Immunization Consent Form

A written consent form is required for all immunizations. A parent or guardian must provide a written consent form for children under 18. Please bring child's current immunization record to the visit.

Johnson County Influenza Surveillance Reports

Kansas regulations do not require health care providers to notify the Johnson County Department of Health and Environment when a patient is diagnosed with influenza. Instead influenza activity is voluntarily reported to JCDHE by family practices, emergency departments, student health centers, pediatric offices and other healthcare providers in Johnson County. Providers may use this form to report their influenza activity to JCDHE.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) also provides influenza surveillance reports. KDHE's reports can be found here.  

Nurse-Family Partnership

Nurse and Family Partnership Logo

Nurse-Family Partnership is a FREE nurse-led home visitation program, offered by the Johnson County Department of Health and Environment. First-time mothers are paired with a nurse home visitor. The mother-to-be and her nurse meet regularly through her pregnancy, the birth of her newborn, until the child turns two. The nurse home visitor provides support, encouragement and guidance. Call 913-826-1228 or 913-477-8104 for more information and to enroll. 

A nurse supports first-time moms to:

NFP Picture

  • Have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby.
  • Become the best mom she can be.
  • Learn about breastfeeding, child development and safety practices that allow first-time moms to build their confidence.
  • Get referrals for childcare, healthcare, job training and other support services in our community.
  • Follow their dreams for the future.

Any woman can enroll in the FREE Nurse-Family Partnership program who:

  • Lives in Johnson County, Kansas
  • Will be parenting her first child
  • Is pregnant 28 weeks or less
  • Meets income requirements

Call 913-826-1228 or 913-477-8104 for more information and to enroll. 

What NFP moms have said:

“My nurse helped me organize my life and thoughts. I appreciate her standing by me through the difficult time of transition.” – Julianna M.

“I love this program. It made such an important, positive impact on my life. I will never forget my nurse or the wonderful things she did for me and my family.” – Anonymous

“I was 17 and pregnant with my first child. Because of their support and counseling, I sought prenatal care and learned about breastfeeding. I stayed in school. They gave me a chance to dream and taught me I didn't have to be a statistic. I graduated from college in the top ten of my nursing class with my BSN.” – Anonymous

“My nurses were experts at what they did. Any question I had, they had the answer or helped me find a solution.” – Shoustone
 

Physical Exams

Adults needing a physical exam for employment or higher education may receive one during walk-in clinic hours. For more information, or if an appointment is required, call (913) 826-1200. If your child/adolescent needs a physical exam for school, sports or camp, please contact your health care provider or the Health Partnership Clinic at 913-648-2266.

Nurse checking woman's blood pressure during physical exam.Nurse Practitioners/Registered Nurses provide adult physical exams for:

  • Employment
  • Child care provider
  • Foster parents
  • Higher education (cosmetology, nursing school, university, etc.)

 

Olathe Clinic Hours:

  • Monday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday - 10:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
  • Thursday - CLOSED
  • Friday - 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Mission Clinic Hours

  • Monday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday - 10:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
  • Thursday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Friday - CLOSED

Exam Fee

$60. Payment required the same day as exam. Cash, check or major credit card is accepted. There is no sliding scale or partial payment option for this service. 

Postpartum Services

Postpartum Visits (Outreach Nurse Program)

Registered Nurses are available for in-home, office or community site visits with new mothers and infants who live in Johnson County. Nurses provide:

outreach nurse

  • Physical/social assessment
  • Assistance with blood pressure monitoring and infant weight checks
  • Education/counseling

Call (913) 826-1228 for more information or to schedule a visit with a nurse. Proof of Johnson County residency is required.

Click here for a list of services that Outreach Nurses provide.

 

Pregnancy Testing

young girlPregnancy testing is available during walk-in clinic hours in Olathe and Mission. The Johnson County Department of Health and Environment is not a primary care provider. If you need medical treatment, please call your health care provider or the Health Partnership Clinic at 913-648-2266.

 
 
Olathe Clinic Hours
  • Monday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday - 10:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
  • Thursday - CLOSED
  • Friday - 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Mission Clinic Hours

  • Monday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday - 10:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
  • Thursday - 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Friday - CLOSED

Family Planning Services

For assistance with family planning and pregnancy related issues, including contraception, please click here.

Paying for Services

No one is denied service due to inability to pay. Client accounts may be subject to collections if not paid.

JCDHE is a KanCare provider for all managed care organizations: Amerigroup, Sunflower and United Community. JCDHE also accepts private insurance from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City, Cigna, Coventry and UnitedHealthcare. We do not take insurance from Coventry Advantra or Humana Gold Plus. Many of the services JCDHE offers are covered by insurance; check your health benefit plan to confirm coverage for payment of services.

JCDHE also accepts cash, check, credit or debit card as payment for clients who are without insurance or who carry other insurance plans.

Prenatal Services

Prenatal services are only available at the Olathe clinic (11875 S. Sunset Drive, Ste. 300). Proof of Johnson County residency is required.

Appointments are necessary for prenatal care. For information or an appointment, call (913) 826-1200.

Skilled staff to meet the needs of mother and baby:

pregnant woman

  • Advanced Practice Registered Nurses
  • Registered Nurses
  • Social Workers
  • Registered Dietitians
  • OB/GYN physicians from the University of Kansas Medical Center
  • Delivery and hospital services provided by the University of Kansas Medical Center

Also provided:

  • Pregnancy testing and counseling
  • Physical examinations on admission, through pregnancy, and postpartum
  • Laboratory testing in a CLIA approved laboratory
  • Assessment and counseling with social workers and dietitians
  • Adoption services referral
  • Individual/group education and videos
  • Postpartum home visits
  • Birth control methods and natural family planning
  • Diagnosis and treatment of minor health problems

Paying for Prenatal Care

  • An appointment is necessary for the prenatal clinic to complete required paperwork
  • Partial payment may be made
  • Accepted payment includes cash, check, or major credit card
  • No one is denied service due to inability to pay
  • Client accounts may be subject to collections if not paid

Prenatal Visits (Outreach Nurse Program)

Registered Nurses are available for in-home, office or community site visits with pregnant women who live in Johnson County. Nurses provide physical assessments, blood pressure monitoring and education/counseling. Call (913) 826-1228 for more information or to schedule a visit with a nurse. Proof of Johnson County residency is required. Click here for a list of services that Outreach Nurses provide.

Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP)

Johnson County's Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) program is responsible for ongoing planning and preparation for a bioterrosim or public health threat in Johnson County. PHEP collaborates with community partners and other County departments to assess and support responses to natural and man-made disasters.

VIDEO: Johnson County's Public Health Emergency Program

For more information or to reach a member of the PHEP staff:

Call: (913) 477-8343

Email: preparedness@jocogov.org

For questions about Dispense Assist:

Call: (913) 477-8343

Email: DispenseAssist@jocogov.org

Rabies Exposures and Animal Bites

Angry dog barking Lecture: Got Bit? Rabies Testing and Animal Bite Procedures (February 21, 2018)

Rabies Prevention: A Community Partnership (Dr. Ingrid Garrison, Kansas Department of Health and Environment)

Rabies Diagnostic Testing and Serology (Dr. Susan Moore, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University)

Rabies Exposure Forms and Documents:

  • Rabies Exposure - Detailed Information Form
    • Replaces JCHD Animal Bite Report Form. Form to be completed by ACOs/CSOs, veterinarians, JCDHE-Environmental, and /or hospital staff if a rabies exposure has occurred. Provides a more thorough summary of a rabies exposure to make future investigation and follow-up easier.
  • Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention & Control, 2016
    • These recommendations serve as a basis for animal rabies prevention and control programs throughout the United States and facilitate standardization of procedures among jurisdictions, thereby contributing to an effective national rabies control program.
  • KDHE Rabies Prevention and Control Guidelines
  • Rabies Facts & Prevention
    • Informational brochure from JCDHE for persons that may have been exposed to rabies, persons that submit a specimen for rabies testing, and/or persons that have questions about rabies exposures.

Rabies Exposures

The Johnson County Department of Health and Environment (JCDHE) works in conjunction with local animal control officers (ACOs) and community service officers (CSOs) in Johnson County to limit the potential for human rabies exposures. The cooperation of many departments and agencies is necessary to provide this critical component of public health. 

Local ACOs and CSOs begin with an initial investigation of a potential rabies exposure, most often an animal bite, and determines the best course of action for each case. Officers will monitor animals that have bitten a person, as well as owned animals that may have been bitten. These officers are very important to the successful management of rabies exposure cases. If you are concerned about an animal, contact the officer in the area where the incident or potential exposure occurred. Click here for a list of Johnson County Animal Control offices.

The JCDHE Environmental Division oversees the submission of animal specimens for rabies testing at the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. They work with ACOs, CSOs, veterinarians, and the general public to organize the shipment and documentation of submitted specimens. The Environmental Division will only accept rabies specimens for cases originating within Johnson County. Please contact the JCDHE Environmental Division at 913-715-6900 before bringing a specimen to their office.

The JCDHE Disease Containment Division works with local animal control and community service officers and the Environmental Division to track cases that are determined to be rabies exposures. They work with ACOs and CSOs to determine the nature of an exposure then plan the management of both the animal and the victim. The Disease Containment Division also works with medical staff to determine which types of treatments the victim may need. Positive rabies cases are then reported to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for tracking purposes.

Submitting a Specimen for Rabies Testing

Please contact the JCDHE Environmental Division at 913-715-6900 before bringing a specimen to their office. To determine if a specimen should be tested for rabies, please contact your local Animal Control office using the above link. If a specimen is to be tested, local ACOs, CSOs, or your veterinarian can prepare the specimen for shipping. We recommend that you rely on these professionals to prepare the specimen to protect you from potential rabies exposure. 

The specimens are shipped to the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (in Manhattan, KS) Monday through Friday, but increased shipping costs apply to Friday shipments because of the need for Saturday delivery. Payment of the shipping fee will be required at the time the specimen is submitted to the JCDHE Environmental Division.

Rabies Testing Fees

Specimen shipping Monday-Thursday: $90.00
Specemen shipping on Friday: $105.00 (requires a Saturday delivery fee)

Rabies Testing Results

The JCDHE Disease Containment Division will inform the victim of the results and submit a copy of the results to the Animal Control Officer, Community Service Officer, and/or veterinarian who was involved in the case. 

Resources for Caregivers

Resources for providers, parents, and anyone else who cares for children.

Kansas Legislature - Laws regarding child care

Kansas Department of Health and Environment - Child care licensing and registration program

Kansas Fire Marshal - Office of the State Fire Marshal

Healthy Childcare Consultants, Inc - Health and safety information for children birth through the age of 8

Healthy Child Care America - Information from the American Academy of Pediatrics

Zero to Three - Educational resource for parents and providers for children aged zero to three years

National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education - Resources to improve the quality of child care and early education programs

Day Care Connection - Daycare Connection offers parents help in finding child care. It also provides training and other resources for child care providers. This agency is a food program sponsor for home daycare providers.

The Family Conservancy - The Family Conservancy offers parenting tips and a parenting class calendar. It also provides training and technical assistance for child care providers. This agency is a food program sponsor for home daycare providers

Emergency Plan for Caregivers -- Use this template to create an emergency plan for your child care facility

Foodsafety.gov -- Get the latest food safety news, sign up for recalls and alerts, and learn how to keep food safe

Lexie's Law

Lexie's Law is a Kansas law passed in 2010 which requires a child care license for all providers caring for unrelated children, increases minimum education requirements for providers applying for a license, improves health and safety requirements, strengthens the child supervision requirements, and permanently prohibits anyone who has had a child care license revoked from receiving another one. The law also requires inspections for child care programs every 12 months and requires the Kansas Department of Health and Environment to maintain an online system of child care records to give families access to compliance history. Read more key points on the KDHE website.

New Federal Safety Regulations

Crib Safety Regulations
Nuevos requerimientos federales para cunas más seguras
Play Yard Safety Standards
Mantenga a su bebé seguro en un corralito

Child Safety Information

Charlie's House YouTube Channel: A variety of short videos to help you make your home safe and injury-free.

KCTV5 report shows how easily young children can access medications and how to keep them out of children's reach.

Find more information about child safety, visit the Safe Kids Johnson County page.

Safe Kids Johnson County

safe kids logoThe Johnson County Department of Health and Environment is the lead agency for Safe Kids Johnson County. The program is affiliated with Safe Kids Worldwide, the first and only national organization dedicated solely to the prevention of unintentional childhood injury - the number one killer of children ages 14 and younger.

Safe Kids Johnson County is comprised of agencies, organizations, and businesses within Johnson County who work to prevent unintentional injury in children.

Objectives of Safe Kids Johnson County include:

Educating the public about preventing childhood injury.

Promoting ongoing awareness of injury prevention issues through the local media.

Organizing activities highlighting various injury prevention strategies such as:

  • Child Passenger Safety Seats Check-Up Events: Trained child safety seat technicians adjust/install car seats properly while teaching parents/caregivers the basics about how to install a car seat at home. Please call (913) 477-8312 for more information about the next Child Passenger Safety Seat Check-Up Event.
  • Child Passenger Safety Technician training.
  • Bike Rodeos/Bike Helmet Fitting Demonstrations: Activities that promote wearing helmets and wearing them correctly, as well as learning the safety rules of the road.
  • Home Safety: Information and events on topics such as: choking, poisoning, water and fire safety.
  • Sports Safety: Information and education on participating in sports injury-free.
  • Celebrate National Safe Kids Week in May with events, activities and information on preventing unintentional childhood injury.
  • Community injury prevention education for professionals, parents, daycare providers, and other caregivers.

Upcoming Community Events:

Child Passenger Safety Seat Fittings and Installations - Locations in Johnson County

Home Safety

Toy and Shopping Safety

Halloween Safety:

Summer Safety:

Child Passenger Safety:

Pedestrian Safety:

Hyperthermia Safety Information:

Baby Safety:

Playground Safety:

Sports Safety Information:

Furniture Safety:

Water Safety/Boating Safety Information:

Medication Safety Information:

Firearm Safety

Poison Prevention:

Product Recalls/Used Children's Products:

Important Links:

IIHS Boosters improve: Most new seats provide good belt fit: Two Safety 1st models are not recommended as boosters

Trouble in Toyland

AAP News, Prevent burns, fires when using space heaters

MMWR, Suffocation Deaths Association with Use of Infant Positioners – United States, 1997-2011

MMWR, Years of Potential Life Lost from Unintentional Injuries Among Persons Aged 0-19 years – US, 2000-2009

Safety Tips

The JCDHE Child Care Licensing Division offers the following tips to help parents and providers keep children safe in very cold and very hot weather. If you have specific questions that are not answered here, please contact us at (913) 477-8339 or (913) 477-8382.

Cold Weather Tips for Parents and Childcare Providers

Download this Child Care Weather Watch chart to help determine what temperatures and weather conditions are appropriate for outdoor play.

Winter brings colder weather. Children get cold (and hot) more easily than adults. This is because young children have relatively more surface area for their body mass than those who are older. Still, going outside when it is cold is a good idea. Germs are less concentrated in the outdoor air. Take the group outside while fresh air circulates from opened windows and/or the ventilation system in the emptied rooms.

Outdoor play in cold weather encourages more vigorous physical activity. In addition, going outside in all types of weather gives children opportunities to learn about changes in the environment. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers tips to enjoy cold weather.

Dress for the Weather
Adults and children lose body heat more quickly if they don’t wear a hat. Choose tightly woven fabrics that keep you warmer by holding in more heat and keeping wind from taking body heat away. Wool or tightly woven synthetic fibers are better than cotton. Cold air holds less moisture than warmer air. So if it is very cold, wear a scarf or knitted face covering. This reduces drying of exposed skin and linings of the nose and throat. Getting too warm can cause sweating. So dress to stay warm, but avoid over-dressing. Perspiration wets clothing. Moisture on the skin wicks heat away from the body. However, wet weather doesn’t need to keep everyone inside. It can be fun to be outside in snow and rain – if you dress in water-resistant clothing that keeps skin dry.

Watch for Shivering
Shivering is the movement of muscles to generate warmth when the body is getting too cold. If someone is shivering despite increased activity, it is time to go inside. Otherwise, body temperature will start to fall.

Defining Cold Injuries
The following definitions of cold injury are from Pediatric First Aid for Caregivers and Teachers, 2nd edition, 2012, pp. 298-303. This manual was written by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Association of School Nurses.

Hypothermia: Lowered body temperature is called hypothermia. Suffering from hypothermia doesn’t require very cold temperatures if the skin gets wet. In addition to shivering, at significantly lowered body temperatures, drowsiness, confusion, slurred speech and shallow breathing can occur. Body temperatures lower than 95 degrees F. are dangerous. First aid for hypothermia is to call EMS. Then take the child to a warm room, remove cold wet clothing, and replace it with warm dry clothing or a blanket. If a warm room isn’t available, wrap the cold person and a warm person together in a blanket.

Frost nip: In freezing temperatures, smaller, exposed body parts suffer cold injury first. Blood vessels in these areas constrict in response to cold. This constriction can make fingers, toes, ear lobes and tip of the nose pale and numb. They are painful as they warm up again. If the part doesn’t actually freeze and no permanent injury occurs, the condition is called “frost nip.” First aid for frost nip is similar to the first aid for hypothermia. Do not rub the injured part. Until you can get to a warm room and replace cold wet clothing with dry warm ones, put the cold body parts close to warm body areas, e.g. hold cold hands in armpits. For 30 minutes, slowly rewarm injured areas in warm (not hot) water around 100 degrees F. Apply warm compresses to the injured area. If warm water isn’t available, gently wrap the area in warm blankets. If the area seems to return to normal, have caregivers/families watch for any evidence of injury that signals the need for medical care.

Frostbite: If body tissues actually freeze, the injury is called frostbite. Frostbite requires medical attention as it can cause permanent damage. The severity of frostbite is graded like burn injuries. First degree frostbite is when tissues become white and hard, and then mildly red and swollen when rewarmed. Second degree frostbite is when blisters appear the next day. Third degree frost bite is when permanent skin damage occurs. First aid for frostbite is to contact EMS and then follow the same procedure as for frost nip until EMS can take over.

Wind Chill Wind: Wind chill wind removes heat from the body faster than would occur just by exposure to the cool temperature. The National Weather Service has a helpful guide. This guide indicates when conditions are comfortable, require caution, or are dangerous for outdoor activities. Outdoor play with proper clothing is OK unless the temperatures are at or below minus 15 degrees F. Check children frequently when conditions require caution. Look for shivering and any signs of early cold injury to hands, toes or other vulnerable body parts. 

Hot Weather Guidelines for Child Care Providers

As temperatures across the country continue to escalate above average highs, it is more important than ever to understand the health effects for children. Infants and young children are particularly sensitive to the effects of extreme heat and must rely on others to keep them safe. When left in a hot vehicle, a young child’s body temperature can increase three to five times as quickly as an adult’s.

hot childRecommendations
The recommendation states that if the heat index is 90ºF to 95ºF (32ºC to 35ºC) or if there is a heat advisory in effect, children should only be outside for short periods of time (15 to 30 minutes or less.)

Base the amount of time outside on the children's appearance and behaviors. If the children are running around and actively playing and do not exhibit any signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke (see signs below), they can be outside on the longer end of the timeframe. If children are sitting or standing around in the shade, take them inside sooner. Morning is the best time to be outside, as it is the coolest part of the day.

A heat index of 95ºF (35ºC) or higher is considered to be the regulations definition of "extreme." On these days it would be expected that children would not have to go outside at all. This is where we see regulation violations occur most. It is important to note that heat indexes are measured in the SHADE. When planning activities in which children will be exposed to full sunshine, add 15 degrees to the stated heat index. Strong winds can also make the heat worse.

Additionally, when there is an excessive heat warning as defined by the National Weather Service, it is recommended that outdoor summer camps be moved to their inside locations for the afternoons.

On "extreme" heat days, it is recommended that field trips only be taken to indoor, air-conditioned locations. If the mode of transportation for the field trip is walking or in a vehicle without air conditioning, the predicted temperature/heat index at the time of the return trip must be considered.

Regulations
The regulations pertaining to children outside in extreme weather are as follows:

Licensed Child Care Centers (including Mother's Day Out and Preschools): K.A.R. 28-4-438(b) and K.A.R. 28-4-126(a)(1).

Licensed School Age Programs: K.A.R. 28-4-590(f)(2) and K.A.R. 28-4-587(a).

Outdoor Summer Camps: K.A.R. 28-4-586(b)(1)(c) and K.A.R. 28-4-586(2).

Licensed Day Care Homes and Group Day Care Homes: K.A.R. 28-4-116(a)(4), K.A.R. 28-4-117(a)(7), and K.A.R. 28-4-126(a)(1).

Definitions
Heat related terms can be confusing. Here are the definitions provided by the National Weather Service.

Excessive Heat occurs from a combination of high temperatures (significantly above normal) and high humidity. At certain levels, the human body cannot maintain a proper internal temperature and may experience heat stroke.

Excessive Heat Outlook is a Climate Prediction Center (CPC) product that is a combination of temperature and humidity over a certain number of days. It is designed to provide an indication of areas of the country where people and animals may need to take precautions against the heat during May to November.

Excessive Heat Warning is issued within 12 hours of the onset of a heat index of at least 105ºF (40ºC) for more than 3 hours a day for 2 consecutive days or a heat index of more than 115ºF (46ºC) for any period of time.

Excessive Heat Watch is issued by the National Weather Service when heat indices in excess of 105ºF (40ºC) during the day combined with nighttime low temperatures of 80ºF (27ºC) or higher occur for two consecutive days.

Heat Advisory is issued within 12 hours of the onset of the following conditions: a heat index of at least 105ºF (40ºC) but less than 115ºF (46ºC) for less than 3 hours per day or nighttime lows above 80ºF (27ºC) for 2 consecutive days.

Heat Exhaustion is a mild form of heat stroke, characterized by faintness, dizziness, and heavy sweating.

Heat Index (HI) or the "Apparent Temperature" is an accurate measure of how hot it really feels when the Relative Humidity (RH) is added to the actual air temperature.

Dangers
Any time there are conditions of high temperature (over 90ºF) coupled with high relative humidity, causing a high heat index, the body has to work very hard to maintain its core temperature of 98.6º. A child's body temperature increases three to five times faster than an adult's body and children are not able to dissipate heat as effectively as adults.

Sweating is one way the body tries to cool itself, However, sweating only cools the body when the water is removed by evaporation. High relative humidity retards this process. Under these conditions, the heart is beating much faster to pump blood through dilated circulatory vessels. The sweat glands are pouring liquid -- including essential dissolved chemicals, such as sodium and chloride -- onto the surface of the skin.

Heat disorders generally have to do with a deduction or collapse of the body's ability to shed heat by circulatory exchanges and sweating or a chemical imbalance caused by too much sweating. When heat gain exceeds the level the body can remove heat, or when the body cannot compensate for fluids and salt lost through perspiration, the temperature of the body's inner core begins to rise and heat-related illness may develop.

Heat-Related Illness
There are three major types of heat related illness.

Heat Cramps are painful spasms usually occurring in muscles of the legs and sometimes in the abdomen. First aid for this situation is to apply firm pressure on cramping muscles or gently massage to relieve spasm. Give sips of water but discontinue water if nausea occurs.

The symptoms of Heat Exhaustion are heavy sweating, weakness, skin that is cold, pale, and clammy, weak pulse, vomiting, and fainting. First aid for heat exhaustion is to get the victim out of the sun immediately. Have the person lie down and loosen their clothing. apply cool, wet cloths. Fan or move victim to air-conditioned room, if possible. Give sips of water but discontinue water if nausea occurs. If vomiting, seek medical attention.

The symptoms of Heat (or Sun) Stroke are hot dry skin, rapid and strong pulse, and possible unconsciousness. Heat stroke is a SEVERE MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Summon emergency medical assistance or get te victim to the hospital immediately. DELAY CAN BE FATAL. While waiting on medical help to arrive, move the victim to a cooler environment. Reduce the body temperature with cold bat or cold wet cloths. Remove clothing and use fans or air-conditioners.DO NOT GIVE FLUIDS.

Prevention
To prevent heat-related illnesses, follow these tips:

  • Outside activities should be reduced, eliminated or rescheduled to the coolest part of the day.
  • Dress for the hot weather. Lightweight, light-colored clothing reflects heat and sunlight and helps your body maintain normal temperatures.
  • Decrease foods that increase your metabolic heat production and increase water loss.
  • Drink plenty of water or other non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated fluids. A person can become dehydrated before they feel thirst. Exceptions to getting increased fluids are people with epilepsy, kidney or liver disease, on fluid restrictive diets or have a problem with water retention.
  • Avoid sunburn. Sunburn makes the job of heat dissipation much more difficult.

Preventing Heat-stroke Related Injury or Death

On average, every 10 days a child dies from heatstroke in a vehicle. These deaths are preventable and everyone in the community, especially child care providers, have a role to play in protecting our children.

Here are a few simple things you can do:

  • Get in touch with designated family members if a child who is regularly in your care does not arrive as expected.
  • Make it part of your everyday routine to account for all children in your care. Set up backup systems to check and double-check that no child is left in the vehicle. Never leave a child unattended in a vehicle—even if the windows are partially open or the engine is running with the air conditioning on. Vehicles heat up quickly; if the outside temperature is in the low 80s, the temperature inside a vehicle can reach deadly levels in only 10 minutes, even with a window rolled down 2 inches.
  • Always make a habit of looking in the vehicle—front and back—before locking the door and walking away.
  • Create reminders to ensure that no child is accidentally left behind in the vehicle. Place an item that is needed at your final destination in the back of the vehicle next to the child or place a stuffed animal in the driver’s view to indicate that a child is in the car seat.
  • Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately if you see a child alone in a hot vehicle. If he or she is in distress due to heat, get the child out as soon as possible and cool him or her down rapidly.

For additional information on heatstroke, visit the Safe Kids website.

Share this Information

As with any recommendation, the data collection and research is ongoing to provide information that is in the best interest of our children in out-of-home care. Feel free to share this information with families of children in your care.

If you have any questions, please contact us at (913) 477-8339 or (913) 477-8382.

 

 

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WIC Community Garden Volunteer Sign-Up

Volunteers of all ages are encouraged to participate. No gardening experience is necessary. We provide tools, gloves and gardening education. Volunteers are needed every Tuesday morning from 7:30-9:30 a.m. All produce harvested from the garden will go to WIC client families in Johnson County. The garden is located at 11875 S. Sunset Drive in Olathe (north side of the Health Services Building).

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