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County Manager's Office

Phone: 913-715-0725

111 S Cherry, Suite 3300, Olathe, KS 66061

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county manager's office

The County Manager's Office is responsible to the Board of County Commissioners and the residents of Johnson County for the effective and efficient delivery of programs and services, using sound management and financial principles while emphasizing high ethical values, innovation, and continuous improvement.

County News

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New grant funding to focus on reducing preventable diseases
December 18, 2014

Our Department of Health and Environment can now do even more to address the issues of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and stroke prevention in our community. Today, the Johnson County Board of County Commissioners voted to accept an annual $600,000 for four years in federal grant funding passed through the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

Read the full news release for more information.

JoCo Transit, KCATA management consolidation finalized
December 17, 2014

It's official. Johnson County Government will contract with the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA) to provide administrative and management services for The JO transit service. The 2‐year Interlocal Cooperation Agreement for Transit Management and Administration Agreement - which will develop a more regional public transit system - was approved by the Johnson County Board of County Commissioners Thursday, Dec. 11 and by the KCATA Board of Commissioners at a special ceremony on Wednesday, Dec. 17.
Approximately six months ago, the Johnson County Transportation Council (JCTC) and the Board of County Commissioners joined KCATA to discuss opportunities for greater integration of operations and management. A joint staff study group prepared a final report indicating a number of significant, positive outcomes in support of management consolidation including an approximate savings of $455,000 for Johnson County.
The major component of the savings are personnel costs, which result directly from KCATA utilizing existing staff, in addition to several new staffing functions.

Haneberg retires after 35 years of improving criminal justice system
December 12, 2014

Risë Haneberg, Criminal Justice Coordinator, retired this week after 35 years of service dedicated to improving Johnson County's criminal justice system. Her innovative programs have been recognized on the state and national level many times.

Haneberg started her career as a juvenile probation officer in 1979 and spent nearly 30 years with Johnson County Court Services, including 13 years as chief. She became the first criminal justice coordinator for Johnson County in 2008. The position did not come with a solid job description; the Board of County Commissioners passed a resolution calling for the study and implementation of effective alternatives to incarceration.

Through the Criminal Justice Advisory Council, Haneberg has worked to ensure that the right person is in the right bed for the right amount of time. Some of the initiatives she has spearheaded include:

Justice Reinvestment: validated actuarial risk prediction tools similar to what is used in the insurance industry, rather than the ability to post bail, is used to determine who is at low-risk of committing another crime or missing court appearances, allowing those offenders to continue working, living at home, and being a productive member of the community.

Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative: prevents youth from becoming further involved in the criminal justice system by improving services to those confined locally or under house arrest.

Mental Health Intercept Project: recognizes the impact of jail on the mentally ill and improves services for that population, such as the mental health co-responder program in the Overland Park Police and Olathe Police Departments.

Second Chance Reentry: changes the way adult misdemeanant offenders are managed, including the expansion of work release and access to funds to assist the offenders to obtain needed services.

Justice Information Management System: improved the county’s data reporting capacity, enabling agencies throughout the criminal justice system to make better-informed decisions.

Read the Fall 2014 edition of JoCo Magazine for more information about Johnson County's innovative criminal justice system programs.

JoCo Transit, KCATA one step closer to management consolidation
December 11, 2014

Efforts to consolidate transit management in the region took another step forward on Thursday when the Johnson County Board of County Commissioners voted to approve the Interlocal Cooperation Agreement for Transit Management and Administration. The agreement will consolidate Johnson County Transit and the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority and develop a more regional public transit system.

Johnson County Transportation Council passed a motion to consolidate services with a unanimous vote on December 2, 2014. The final essential vote is expected to take place at the KCATA Board of Commissioners meeting on Dec. 17.

Approximately six months ago, the Johnson County Transportation Council (JCTC) and the Board of County Commissioners joined KCATA to discuss opportunities for greater integration of operations and management. A joint staff study group prepared a final report indicating a number of significant, positive outcomes in support of management consolidation including an approximate savings of $455,000 for Johnson County.

The major component of the savings are personnel costs, which result directly from KCATA utilizing existing staff, in addition to several new staffing functions.

WIC Community Garden wins Sustainable Success Story honors
December 5, 2014

The Johnson County WIC Community Garden is feeding families in need and winning awards. The garden will receive a Sustainable Success Stories Award from the Mid-America Regional Council on Friday, December 5th. This annual award is highly competitive and the WIC Community Garden joins eight other community projects in achieving this honor. Award recipients are selected based on their ability to advance the three pillars of sustainability — social equity, economic vitality and environmental stewardship.

The mission of the WIC Community Garden is to educate, empower and feed the clients in the Kansas Women, Infants, Children (WIC) program, creating a healthier community. In its second year, the garden produced 1500 pounds of fresh vegetables. All of the produce harvested from the garden was distributed to over 800 families enrolled in the WIC program, many of whom also helped volunteer in the garden. The garden tripled in size from 2013 to 2014 and a micro orchard was planted this fall further expanding the ability to teach and feed Johnson County’s most vulnerable residents.

The current federal stipend for fruits and vegetables to nursing and pregnant women enrolled in the WIC program is $10 per month, and children only receive $6 per month. While clients appreciate this help, the WIC community garden provides an additional opportunity for them to get fresh fruits and vegetables. The garden is located on public county property just a few feet from the front door of the Olathe WIC office where over 4,000 clients are currently enrolled in the program. WIC clients who volunteer are given first pick of the fresh fruits and vegetables, and the remaining produce is distributed to clients through the main office.

Volunteers are welcome to participate in this exciting and beneficial community garden. They can sign up by contacting the volunteer coordinator at gardencoordinator@jocogov.org or signing up online at www.jocogov.org.

Picking the perfect tree is easier than you think
December 3, 2014

When it comes to the holiday season, choosing the type of tree that will take center stage in our homes can be a big decision. Dennis Patton, the horticulture agent at Johnson County's K-State Research and Extension Office, has some suggestions for choosing the perfect tree for your family and keeping it fresh. If you're ready to test your tree-selecting skills, stop by Mildale Farm on Saturday Dec. 6, for Johnson County Park & Recreation District and Kansas City WildLands' Red Cedar Christmas Tree Event.

A live tree has a unique feel, look and smell. Live trees are a renewable resource that helps promote American agriculture. Artificial trees are made from plastic. A live tree supports small independent growers, not a retail giant. But for some families, allergies or a hectic holiday traveling schedule make a real tree difficult to manage, making a plastic tree the better fit.

For those who do purchase a real tree, wandering through tree lots dreaming about what could be and the fun of putting up and decorating the tree are among the happiest moments of the season. There is something about looking at tree after tree for the one that is just perfect. Each person has different needs when picking out a tree. Finding that “just right” tree is in the eye of the beholder.

Size matters

Before loading up the family and heading to the tree lot, determine the size of your ideal tree. How tall and wide can the tree be for your location? Trees may look small in a wide-open space but they have a habit of suddenly growing too big for their designated space once indoors.

Location in the home

In addition to size, it is important to think about where the tree will be located. In many homes, the tree is placed in a corner or along a wall - important information in the selection process. The tree with a bare side may be the best choice, as it will fit nicely along the wall taking up less space. It is difficult to find a tree with four good sides, but often two or three nice sides will do the trick.

Tree care

Before placing the tree in the stand, cut off about 1 inch of the trunk and immediately place in the stand with warm water.

It's important that the tree has a constant supply of water to maintain freshness. If you notice the tress using less water as days or weeks go by, add hot water to the stand. Additives such as bleach, aspirin or other products are unnecessary, as the tree only needs water.

How long will the tree stay fresh?

It depends on the species of tree, but most will remain fresh for three to four weeks. After that point, the needles will start to dry, and the tree will often shed. Keeping the tree out of heat drafts also will increase the life of the tree.